10 Huge Bands From The 70s’ You Forgot About

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PERUVEN (Jorge Fuxá) / Youtube

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Pop culture during the7 0s is often mistakenly remembered as hoodie and disco. But as you dig deeper and listen more closely, you will discover that there is much, much more than that. The artists on this list fused diverse genres, cultures, and sounds, resulting in a broad cultural adventure that extended from the sparkling soul to the beginning of glam rock. We look back at the 10 Huge Bands From The 70s’ You Forgot About :

The Sweet

Initially, they were called The Sweetshop, these glamorous and sassy early rockers boasted a hit catalog, including the chart-topping 1973 single “Blockbuster” and shiny leather pants.

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Shocking Blue

A Dutch psychedelic band that achieved worldwide success with the single “Venus”, which reached number one just two months after 1970, ushering in a new decade to the band’s wild sonic styles.

Jigsaw

This British group took the hard way, eschewing synths and disco balls in approval of heavy guitars and stage effects that introduced fire-devouring amps, explosions of amps, and flaming drum kits. This kind of antics joined with true classic 70s sound produced many hits.

Edison Lighthouse

While this particular band was a true one-hit marvel with the single “Love Grows (Where My Rosemary Goes)”, frontman Tony Burrows was indeed a musical meddler, recording concurrently with various bands that produced a plethora of hits from the top 20.

Slade

With tremendous sales, many hits, and a half-century run, this band of confidence may have ushered in ’80s rock more than any other more recognizable group, fusing heavy glamor with high-energy concerts. Also, they achieved 11 top-five hits in just four years and sold 50 million albums.

Chic

The disco music of discos, this New York band made hits that built into later singles like “Good Times” and “Le Freak” that lasted for decades, the latter being Atlantic Records’ biggest hit until 1990.

The Manhattans

Jersey City’s early R&B was Manhattan’s stronghold. Their number one hit, “Kiss and Say Goodbye”, was the second platinum single in history.

Mungo Jerry

This upbeat British quartet with a strange nickname, led by Ray Dorset, had an affection for skiffle music and blues. The group’s most significant call to fame? The inevitable and somewhat charming 1970 hit “In The Summertime.”

Bread

Bread was chart-topping, easy-listening material that could perceive heavy without going deep and aided produce a new kind of genre; soft-rock. Some would describe this specific ’70s sound influential, but few had Bread’s rank within such a categorized genre, a rank that prevailed decades later

T.Rex

From the intellectual mind of the late Marc Bolan, this monster band of folk duo turned glam rock, has so many good materials that it’s unfair, with 1972’s “Bang a Gong (Get it On)” being the most prosperous, but merely the track from the band’s list deserve listening to. Regrettably, we didn’t witness how the band could have ended up due to Bolan’s unexpected demise at age 29.