5 Songs That Made Led Zeppelin A Success In The 70’s

Advertisement

via @OLD TAPES | YouTube

Advertisement
Advertisement

Five decades ago, the English band led by the voice of Robert Plant, released their first album with hits like “Good times, bad times” and “Dazed and confused”. This was followed by albums II, III, and IV, which demonstrated the virtuosity of musicians in the rock genre. We look back at the 5 Songs That Made Led Zeppelin A Success In The 70’s:

Black Dog

This track with clear Blues influences a la Fleetwood Mac. Black Dog was named after a stray dog ​​who used to visit the band while they were recording at Headley Grange. The song’s riff was created by Jones after listening to psychedelic rock from Muddy Waters’ “Electric Mud” album.

Advertisement

 

Rock and Roll

The song emerged during the hippie boom where LSD tablets were offered in the squares and girls wore flowers in their hair, the song was created inspired by the folk singer Joni Mitchell as well as inspired by the love of the members down the west coast (California).

 

Stairway to Heaven

Not long ago, in 2016, they sued the band for alleged plagiarism of this issue, an occasion that served to bring together after a decade the musicians Robert Plant and Jimmy Page who together faced the trial and defended their song. Later the verdict had favored Led Zeppelin, one of the subsequent statements was that “people want to hang from someone else’s work when they succeed.”

 

Kashmir

The highlight of the album (Physical Graffiti), the new gem Page had been obsessively working on, and surely the most “monumental” song in Led Zeppelin history, with permission from Stairway to Heaven. It is a long theme divided into several parts, where oriental influences, orchestral arrangements, and an exotic dreamlike aureole predominate, the lyrics of which are inspired by Plant’s trips to the Moroccan desert.

 

When the Levee Breaks

At one point between 1970 and 1971, Jimmy Page proclaimed himself to be the one who made Led Zeppelin sound just as it sounded, accompanied by Bonham’s drums which were miked by Page while they recorded at home and they took advantage of that very natural acoustic sound to create the massive kick that opens When the Levee Breaks.