Dedicated Metal Fan Turns His Uncle’s Skeleton To A Guitar

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via @MetalSucks | YouTube

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A metal musician has made headlines for a very unusual event: the manufacture of a guitar with the bones of his deceased uncle which involved him in the vast world of this sub-genre of rock.

It is about Prince Midnight, a lover of metal and who used his spine, ribs, sternum, and hips to make this curious contraption. Not only with that, but the boy also used the remains of a Fender Telecaster, so it finally turned out to be a hybrid between the bones of the deceased man and the guitar.

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His uncle, Fillip, died in 1996 in an accident in Greece, in case you were thinking about the way he perished. His skeleton was donated to a university. However, his nephew managed to recover part of these remains, which helped university students for 20 years.

In Greece, the country where Prince Midnight is from, the church does not approve the cremation of bodies, so the bones are still with theirs.

 

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A post shared by Prince Midnight (@princemidnightx)

 

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A post shared by Prince Midnight (@princemidnightx)

 

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A post shared by Prince Midnight (@princemidnightx)

 

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A post shared by Prince Midnight (@princemidnightx)

 

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A post shared by Prince Midnight (@princemidnightx)

 

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A post shared by Prince Midnight (@princemidnightx)

 

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A post shared by Prince Midnight (@princemidnightx)

Filip told to MetalSucks:

“So, I got the box of bones from Greece and didn’t know what to do at first. Bury them? Cremate them? Put them in the attic? All seemed like poor ways to memorialize someone who got me into heavy metal.

“So, I decided to turn Uncle Filip into a guitar, which proved to be challenging. I did a lot of research and no one has ever made a guitar out of a skeleton. So, I did it. I started out consulting with two guys in Dean Guitars’ wood shop in Tampa but they got cold feet.

“Anyways, now Uncle Filip can shred for all eternity. That’s how he would want it. I’m super proud of the project and how it serves to honor him, his life, and his influence on me.