Rock Covers That Are More Famous Than The Originals

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via @Jimi Hendrix / YouTube

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You probably didn’t even imagine it, but some of your favorite songs are nothing more than a rehash that ended up having much more fame than the original version. We look at the Rock Covers That Are More Famous Than The Originals in the list below:

 

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With a Little Help from My Friends – Joe Cocker (Original, The Beatles)

Original by The Beatles, but in this case, it is undeniable that Joe Cocker’s version is extraordinary and recovers the meaning of the song released in 1967 and included on the album Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, by the Beatles. The original theme is above all famous for being one of the few sung by Ringo Starr. But sadly for Starr, the Joe Cocker cover has become more popular.

 

Cum on Feel the Noize – Quiet Riot (Original, Slade)

You may know the song through the band Quiet Riot, but it was first performed by the group Slade, who managed to reach the top of several popularity charts. We can also listen to it under the interpretation of the Oasis group.

 

I Love Rock N Roll – Joan Jett (Original, Arrows)

Apparently, inspired by Slade, similar songs appeared on the market and a group called Arrows created this song, especially for a television program in the seventies, but the theme became famous with Joan Jett’s, although we have heard it on the voices of Kristen Wigg and even Britney Spears.

 

Hurt – Johnny Cash (Original, Nine Inch Nails)

The Nine Inch Nails song was written by Trent Reznor for 1994’s The Downward Spiral album. The album was released on Nothing Records and Interscope Records on April 17, 1995. In 2002 Johnny Cash covered this with the Rick Rubin production.

Stone Cold Crazy – Metallica (Original, Queen)

It was performed live at most of the concerts performed during the early years of Queen, it was not a single but it is track 8 of the 1974 Sheer Heart Attack. It is also on the Classic Queen and Queen Rocks compilation albums.

 

Twist And Shout – The Beatles (Original, The Top Notes)

The song composed by Phil Medley and Bert Russell originally titled ‘Shake It Up, Baby’ was recorded by The Top Notes and later covered by The Isley Brothers, but the best known version was the one included on The Beatles’ first album : Please Please Me. Also The Mamas & the Papas reinterpreted the theme on their album Deliver (1967).

 

Where Did You Sleep Last Night – Nirvana (Original, Unknown)

Also known as “In The Pines” and “My Girl”, it is an American folk song from approximately the 1870s, believed to be from southern Appalachia and although it has been covered by a significant number of artists including Nirvana, Leadbelly, Bill Monroe, The Louvin Brothers, Doc Watson, Bob Dylan, The Grateful Dead, Connie Francis, Mark Lanegan, Dolly Parton, among others, the identity of the author is unknown.

 

All Along The Watchtower – Jimi Hendrix (Original, Bob Dylan)

On January 21, 1968, Jimi Hendrix recorded his version of Bob Dylan’s song ‘All Along the Watchtower’ at Olympic Studios in London, where the Rolling Stones always recorded. Brian Jones and Dave Mason of Traffic also featured in the session for this historic recording.

Sweet Dreams – Marilyn Manson (Original, Eurythmics/Annie Lennox/Dave Stewart)

It is probably the best-known song by the British duo Eurythmics, Annie Lennox, and Dave Stewart. It was released in 1983 as a single from their self-titled album; It reached number 2 on the UK singles chart and number 1 on the Billboard Hot 100.

 

Cat’s In The Cradle – Ugly Kid Joe

Harry Chapin’s folk-rock song from the Verities & Balderdash album was released in 1974. Harry Chapin had a big hit with Cats in the Cradle. The single went to number one and was his big hit. Chapin had another hit with W*O*L*D (1974). His last two albums were the penultimate Sequel (1980) and then The Last Protest Singer, released posthumously in 1988.