Relive 5 Tracks From Humble Pie Back In The 70s’

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Formed in 1969 by vocalist and rhythm guitarist Steve Marriott (at the time, recently out of Small Faces), lead guitarist and occasional vocalist Peter Frampton (who had previously played for The Herd), bassist Greg Ridley (founding member of another forgotten great band, Spooky Tooth) and finally, drummer Jerry Shirley (who at the time was 17 years old!), the Humble Pie, celebrated as a “super-group”, proved to be a perfect fruit of its musical time. Relive 5 Tracks From Humble Pie Back In The 70s’:

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5. Thunderbox (1974)

There is nothing you’ll ever love more than Steve Marriott’s voice. It always gives you the chills. Thunderbox was the title track from the band’s 1974 album, Thunderbox.

 

4. Up Our Sleeve (1973)

A fan-favorite track from the group’s 1973 album, Eat It. This song gives you the goosebumps, the guitar playing, the drums, the basslines, and, of course, Steve Marriot’s voice – something that is music for the good ear. 

 

3. I Don’t Need No Doctor (1971)

Among the different versions of this track that Ray Charles popularized, fan-favorite has undoubtedly always been that of Humble Pie. Humble Pie’s version of “I Don’t Need No Doctor” destroys any other you can think of. Their arrangement is the one used by almost all later versions, but the power that Steve Marriott and the company gave to the theme continues to be today above any other. 

 

2. Stone Cold Fever (1971)

“Stone Cold Fever” was included from the 1971 album “Rock On.” The track reached the 118th place on the Billboard 200. A masterpiece of a great British band in their latest work with the original lineup, part of Peter Frampton. A must for lovers of Rock made in the U.K. and the very first Hard Rock.

 

1. 30 Days in the Hole (1972)

Rock Anthem of 1972. During the election year, the United States and Vietnam were tired of war, with stripes and cigarettes everywhere. The best rock doper song ever – released from the band’s 1972 album, Smokin’.

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