The Story Of James Bond Dissing The Beatles

Advertisement

via YouTube

Advertisement
Advertisement

Prime supporters of counterculture in the U.K. experienced an important day on Oct. 5, 1962. That’s when the Beatles’ first single, “Love Me Do,” was released; it’s also the day the first James Bond movie, Dr. No, released in theaters.

Both would have an influence on a worldwide culture in the times that followed, including the Beatles expressing a unique form of musical expression while Sean Connery’s 007 pioneered the characters of the sexual revolution.

Advertisement

However, it wasn’t all dull sailing – particularly when the smooth spy dissed the Beatles two years after their appearance.

Captured in a scene from Goldfinger , Bond is pleasing a woman in a bedroom when he recognizes their champagne has become too warm. As he brings a replacement, he explains, “My dear girl, there are some things that just aren’t done, such as drinking Dom Perignon ’53 above the temperature of 38 degrees Fahrenheit. That’s as bad as listening to the Beatles without earmuffs.”

Conceivably predictable, given that both were fundamental to the ‘60s lifestyle, Bond and the Beatles would cross paths several times. In their first film, A Hard Day’s Night, issued just months before Goldfinger, a scene takes place in the casino seen in Dr. No. The scene highlights actress Margaret Nolan, whose following appearance was as Dink in Goldfinger. Another actor, Richard Vernon, appears in both films.

Keep going for the video below:

×

Like Us on Facebook!